The Music of China's Nomads

Xinjiang is China's westernmost province, home to almost 20 million people, including the majority of the country's 1.2 million Kazakhs, and almost 160,000 Kyrgyz. Here, social and economic pressures are presenting new challenges as local ethnic groups strive to preserve traditions. | Read More
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Introduction
Xinjiang, China’s Central Asia
The Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region is China's westernmost province, home to almost 20 million people, including the majority of the country's 1.2 million Kazakhs, and almost 160,000 Kyrgyz. As the rioting that broke out on July 5 underscores, culture is a sensitive issue in the region. Kazakhs and Kyrgyz have found that music is a way to keep their respective traditions alive. | Read More
The Instruments
The Instruments of China's Nomads
Music of China's Nomads introduces three instruments that are part of the cultural traditions of Kazakhs and Kyrgyz in China's Xinjiang Province -- the dömbra, the komuz, the sybyzghy. Read More
Traditional Culture
Traditional Culture Survived China's Tumultuous Century, But How Will it Fare in the Future?
Perhaps the most dangerous era for traditional ways of life in China was the Cultural Revolution of 1965-76. During this era, all traditional music, crafts and beliefs were categorically banned, and their practitioners were in danger of arrest. In Xinjiang, traditional music and culture is making a comeback today. Masters have reemerged to share their musical talents with students. Meanwhile, government associations are trying to safeguard traditional cultures. | Read More



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