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Georgia's Nonagenarians Talk About Their Long Lives

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Olgha Machitadze, 91: “From the day my child was born I was happy until the day they all died.” (Read more below)

Olgha Machitadze, 91, worked as a teacher of Georgian literature in a secondary school. She was married and had a son, but her family died in an accident. She still loves to read. “How I love them all, you don't know. I love to read and I read even now. Now I just have brochures, no books … I can't choose. I am Georgian and I love everything Georgian.”

When were you the happiest?: “From the day my child was born I was happy until the day they all died.”

What is the secret to your long life?: “Patience and a happy life.”

Ana Gordadze, 91, was a doctor by profession and worked in the statistics office of one of Tbilisi's best hospitals for 60 years. Both of her children are dead and she chose not to live with her grandchildren so she moved to one of Georgia's few retirement homes. “I have my own sorrow. I don't want music or dance so I came here and I am very satisfied.” Gordadze knits and sews. She knitted and sewed all the curtains and lamp shades in her room. During the three years she has lived at the retirement home she started to write poetry as well.

To read the full story

Molly Corso is a freelance reporter and photojournalist based in Tbilisi.

Georgia's Nonagenarians Talk About Their Long Lives

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