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Bishkek Suffering from De-Facto Trade Embargo Following Upheaval

A Kyrgyz border official checks a car bound for Kazakhstan in June 2006. (Photo: Dean C.K. Cox)

Kyrgyzstan is paying a severe economic price for its political instability. The Central Asian country is suffering from a de facto trade embargo, as neighboring states, including China, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, are keeping their respective borders closed.

Some Bishkek-based analysts say neighboring countries are not eager to see Kyrgyzstan’s provisional government, which replaced Kurmanbek Bakiyev’s administration amid early April popular unrest, succeed in reorienting the country in a more democratic direction. [For background see the EurasiaNet archive].
Authoritarian-minded leaders in other Central Asian states worry that the recent Kyrgyz events set an unwelcome precedent, perhaps encouraging opposition movements elsewhere to agitate for change. [For background see the EurasiaNet  archive].

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Ulan Temirov is the pseudonym for a Kyrgyz journalist.

Bishkek Suffering from De-Facto Trade Embargo Following Upheaval

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