X
X

As An Afghan River Border Shifts, Murder Follows

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Every spring, as the Amu Darya floods, the border it marks with Turkmenistan moves deeper into this corner of northwestern Afghanistan.

Now, the river is as much as 25 kilometers farther south than it was 30 years ago in parts of Jawzjan Province. In the village of Yaz Ariq Dinar, just a stone's throw from the advancing border, fear runs high.

The villagers are losing their land to an advancing foreign country. And though both they and those across the border are ethnic Turkmen, there seems to be little room for understanding.

Abdul Jabar, a cowherd from Yaz Ariq Dinar on the Afghan side of the border, was unwilling to give up the grazing land that once adjoined his village. So, he put the cattle aboard a makeshift raft and poled it across the water. Then he moved out of sight with the animals through the scrubland and scattered trees.

When Turkmenistan border guards returned his badly mutilated body to the Afghan side the next day, it was clear he had suffered a terrible fate.

"From the pelvis to the chin, the front of the body had been cut open and then stitched back together," says the village notary, Noor Mohammed, who saw the corpse.

To read the full story

RFE/RL Turkmen Service correspondent Shahmurdan Muradi, who recently traveled to northern Afghanistan from Kabul, contributed to this report.

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

As An Afghan River Border Shifts, Murder Follows

1 / 1
X
> <