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Russia, Georgia: Elections and the Olympics Fueling Changes?

A Eurasianet partner post from Stratfor

Since the Russo-Georgian war of August 2008 and the subsequent buildup of Russia’s military presence in the breakaway Georgian territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, relations between Moscow and Tbilisi have remained mostly consistent . Russia has maintained its position of relative strength over Georgia and established its military position in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, building bases in both territories with approximately 1,500 troops each. Russia also has seen no need to move forces farther into Georgia; its troops are within miles of Tbilisi, but a pre-emptive move toward the Georgian capital could create a war of attrition or inspire a harsh reaction from the West. Meanwhile, Georgia has failed to gain the kind of support it wanted from NATO and its other Western allies. It is no closer to NATO membership than it was three years ago, and Tbilisi faces a de facto arms embargo from the West — a result of the United States’ focus on the Middle East and South Asia and U.S. and NATO dependence on Russia regarding the war in Afghanistan.

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A Eurasianet partner post from Stratfor

Russia, Georgia: Elections and the Olympics Fueling Changes?

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