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Turkey: As the Doner Turns

Veteran Turkey correspondent Andrew Finkel is also a noted food lover and a superb writer on culinary matters. In a column in today's International Herald Tribune, Finkel takes a wide ranging look at the history of Turkish kebab and its role in today's globalized culture. From his column:

Can any one cuisine call the kebab its own? Was the meat skewer born somewhere — or everywhere, of the primal urge to put flesh to fire?

This year commemorates the 50th year that Turks were first recruited to work in Germany. Many believe that these gastarbeiter managed to wriggle a way into their hosts’ affection by presenting to them an alternative to wurst. A cylinder of meat spinning on an upright spit in front of a vertical open fire — the famous döner kebab — became Germans’ entrée into the culture of their new neighbors. Or so they thought. But no less an authority than The Economist claims that the kebab is an example of cultural reflux: a bit of ethnicity cultivated in Germany and transplanted back to Turkey, where it then thrived.

To read the full story

Turkey: As the Doner Turns

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