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Olympics: China Wants Some Credit for Kazakhstan’s Gold

Kazakhstan's gold medalist "Zulfiya Chinshanlo" training in July 2011. Photo: Ikuru Kuwajima

When photographer Ikuru Kuwajima and I visited Kazakhstan's Olympic weightlifting training camp in July 2011, it was difficult to get much out of Zulfiya Chinshanlo, the 19-year-old weightlifter who on July 29 brought Kazakhstan its second gold at the London games. 

Neither Chinshanlo, nor her friend Maiya Maneza, could manage more than a few fragments of Russian. And they spoke no Kazakh.

"They’re Dungans [...] from Bishkek," said Kazakhstan's trainer Alexey Ni, as they stood shyly together in one corner of the gym, giggling like the teenage girls that they still are, despite their bulging muscles. "They’re very hard-working. There are only a few Dungan people, not so many."

The Dungans, a Chinese people speaking a language related to Mandarin, are Muslim converts who fled to Central Asia in the 19th Century.

For Kazakhstan to include two of them on its Olympic team demonstrated exemplary inclusiveness.

Only Ni’s story is now being challenged. 

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Olympics: China Wants Some Credit for Kazakhstan’s Gold

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