X
X

Georgian Villagers Irate As Fence Goes Up On South Ossetia Boundary

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

With its gently rolling hills and sun-drenched orchards, the small Georgian village of Dvani could easily be described as picturesque, were it not for a barbed-wire fence that runs through it.

Dvani, home to around 1,000 inhabitants, straddles the demarcation line that separates the breakaway region of South Ossetia from the rest of Georgia.

The village's unfortunate location has placed it on the front line of a territorial dispute that has pitted Tbilisi against South Ossetia's Russia-backed separatists since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

In 2008 -- almost two decades after an armed conflict between Georgian government forces and South Ossetian rebels -- Dvani was shelled and looted during the brief Russia-Georgia war over the divisive region.

And when Russia subsequently recognized South Ossetia as a sovereign state, Dvani found itself, in Moscow's eyes, sitting on a fully fledged national border -- one that Georgians say is creeping deeper into their lands.

Last month, Russian troops began unfurling barbed wire along the boundary line, effectively separating people in Dvani from their farmland, ancestral homes, and cemeteries.

To read the full story

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Georgian Villagers Irate As Fence Goes Up On South Ossetia Boundary

1 / 1
X
> <