X
X

Kyrgyzstan: Nationalists Again Pushing “Foreign Agents” Bill

Nationalists are renewing efforts in Kyrgyzstan to secure vague legislation to require non-profit organizations that receive money from abroad to register as foreign agents.

MP Tursunbai Bakir uulu, one of the new bill’s sponsors, told EurasiaNet.org on June 17 that he hopes parliament will consider the measure before it adjourns for its summer recess at the end of June. “NGOs need to be more transparent,” Bakir uulu said. “Society needs to know how the money sent from abroad is spent.”

Bakir uulu’s initiative marks the second attempt to pass “foreign agents” legislation targetting organizations that engage in "political activities." The first attempt stalled in parliament.

On June 16, a small protest occurred in the capital Bishkek, expressing support for the “foreign agents” bill. Jenishbek Moldokmatov, a leader of the Kalys nationalist group and one of the protests organizers, called it “just the beginning” of a campaign to place restrictions on foreign-funded NGOs. Kalys has gathered 5,000 petition signatures in favor of the “foreign agents” bill, Moldokmatov said.

Moldokmatov also organized an anti-gay protest in February outside the US Embassy in Bishkek, during which the protesters burned a portrait of local blogger Ilya Lukash, who was vilified as a “gay activist.” 

In a June 17 interview with EurasiaNet.org, Lukash said he felt compelled to flee Kyrgyzstan because he “was not feeling safe and was getting constant threats via phone calls and text messages.” Lukash went on to assail Kalys and Moldokmatov for trying to stigmatize political opponents by labeling them “homosexuals” or “foreign agents.” 

Civil society activists and international organizations are voicing concerns about recent legislative developments in Kyrgyzstan. Human Rights Watch in a May 29 press release stated that “Kyrgyzstan should decisively reject legislative proposals,” including the “foreign agents” bill and an initiative to criminalize "homosexual propaganda."

“These draft laws fly in the face of Kyrgyzstan’s human rights commitments – they would violate the fundamental rights to speech and association,” said Mihra Rittman, Central Asia researcher at Human Rights Watch.

Moldokmatov admits that non-governmental organizations have contributed to country’s development, but claims that many of them have political agenda. “Those screaming out against this bill are the ones who are afraid [because they] were engaged in the political activities,” he said.
 

Kyrgyzstan: Nationalists Again Pushing “Foreign Agents” Bill

1 / 1
X
> <