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What Does Greek Crisis Mean for Azerbaijan’s Energy Interests?

Workers stack sections of pipe to be used in the construction of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP). While Greece is interested in obtaining a stake in TAP, Azerbaijan’s SOCAR hopes to complete the purchase of a 66-percent stake in Greek gas transmission operator DESFA. (Photo: Trans-Adriatic Pipeline)

The near collapse of Greece’s economy has raised pressing questions for energy power Azerbaijan, which had viewed the country as a potential turbo boost for its energy ambitions in the European Union. Now, as Athens cleans house financially and talks deeper energy ties with Russia, Azerbaijan, which has an agreement to purchase a majority share in Greece’s gas distribution network, needs to protect its own interests, energy analysts say.
 
Azerbaijan’s entry point into Greece comes via the Trans-Adriatic Pipeline (TAP), an 870-kilometer-long gas pipeline which, by around 2019, will bring Greece, Albania and Italy 10 billion cubic meters of Azerbaijani gas per year – part of a 3,500-kilometer-plus-long pipeline network from the Caspian Sea called the Southern Gas Corridor.
 

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Lamiya Adilgizi is a freelance Azerbaijani reporter.

What Does Greek Crisis Mean for Azerbaijan’s Energy Interests?

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