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What Happened to the August 1991 Soviet Coup Plotters?

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

 
Eleven hard-liners in the Soviet government, military, Communist Party, and KGB were named in a Russian court as the organizers of the failed August 1991 coup against Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev.
 
They included the so-called “Gang of Eight” that had placed Gorbachev under house arrest -- a short-lived, self-declared provisional government that called itself the State Committee for the Emergency Situation was known by its Russian acronym, GKChP. They also included three other senior Soviet political and military officials.
 
One “Gang of Eight” member, Soviet Interior Minister Boris Pugo, committed suicide shortly after the coup collapsed.
 
The 10 other men named as coup plotters were all granted amnesty by the State Duma on February 23, 1994 -- ending their 14-month trial, on high treason charges, by the military branch of the Supreme Court.
 
They went on to play various roles in politics and the private sector in post-communist Russia.
 
Vladimir Kryuchkov, Soviet KGB Chief
 

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Copyright (c) 2016. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

What Happened to the August 1991 Soviet Coup Plotters?

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