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Central Asia: What Will US Foreign Policy Toward the Region Look Like?

US Deputy Assistant Secretary for Central Asia Dan Rosenblum (center) and US Ambassador in Uzbekistan Pamela Spratlen (left) meet with Akmal Saidov, the head of the government-controlled National Human Rights Centre of the Republic of Uzbekistan, at a ceremony in Tashkent on February 24. (Photo: US Embassy in Uzbekistan)

A few days after the arrest of a leading opposition politician in Kyrgyzstan, the US State Department replied to a reporter’s query about the incident with a circumspect statement.
 
“We refer you to the government of the Kyrgyz Republic for information on the details of this case,” the note addressed to Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty stated.
 
The note was brief. Yet it was tellingly dismissive, and possibly spoke volumes about the future look of Washington’s human rights agenda under the Trump administration.
 
Central Asian governments are taking note, given that some of them, in particular Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, are among the world’s most serial violators of political, religious and media freedoms.
 

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Central Asia: What Will US Foreign Policy Toward the Region Look Like?

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