X
X

Punitive Psychiatry Reemerges in Post-Soviet States

Crimean Tatar political activist Ilmi Umerov (second from left) during a trial in Simferopol, Crimea. The Russian authorities charged Umerov with criminal separatism and detained him at a psychiatric facility for several weeks for opposing Russia’s annexation of Crimea. (Photo: Ilmi Umerov’s Facebook account)

Last summer, Crimean Tatar political activist Ilmi Umerov was receiving treatment for high blood pressure in a Simferopol hospital when FSB officers showed up one day and hauled him off to a psychiatric facility for an evaluation.
 
Umerov, a former deputy chairman of the Mejlis, the Crimean Tatar representative body, had been a vocal critic of Russia’s annexation of Crimea. In May 2016, the FSB charged him with criminal separatism after he declared, in Tatar: “We must force Russia to withdraw from Crimea.”

To read the full story

Madeline Roache is a London-based freelance journalist focusing on human rights conditions in the former Soviet Union. She recently completed an MA in Russian politics at University College London.

Punitive Psychiatry Reemerges in Post-Soviet States

1 / 1
X
> <