X
X

Uzbekistan and Polygamy: New Love and Broken Hearts

Uzbekistan’s President Shavkat Mirziyoyev meets with clerics in Tashkent in April 2017. Mirziyoyev pledged to combat polygamy more robustly and stated that “every mullah that performs the nikah rites without a witness or marriage registration documents will be punished.” (Photo: Shavkat Mirziyoyev Facebook page)

Jalil Buriyev left Uzbekistan for Russia two decades ago, when he was just 18. He started out working as a lumberjack in Abakan, the capital of Russia’s Republic of Khakassia, and made what was then considered good money. After four years, he returned home and married Sanobar, a woman from his village in southeastern Uzbekistan’s Kashkadarya Province.
 
Despite tying the knot, Jalil continued to spend most of his time in Abakan, where 10 years later he married a local ethnic Khakas woman called Ilona. Sanobar, with whom he had two daughters, reluctantly gave her blessing.
 
“What was I supposed to do? My husband has been working there for 20 years and comes home every two years. I never imagined he would betray me in this way. I went to the imam for advice. He told me that if a man is able to provide for two families, then he is free to go ahead and marry,” Sanobar told EurasiaNet.org.
 
Earlier this year, Jalil returned to his home village with his Khakas wife and their six-year-old daughter in tow.
 

To read the full story

Uzbekistan and Polygamy: New Love and Broken Hearts

1 / 1
X
> <