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As Armenia Walks Tightrope Between Russia And EU, Public Opinion May Be Shifting

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

For nearly a week now, several dozen youth activists have held a nonstop sit-in outside the office of Yerevan's mayor, protesting a rise in public-transit fares and demanding the dismissal of the officials who implemented them.

The sit-in comes in the wake of much larger protests against the price rise, which the government says became necessary after Russia sharply increased rates for natural gas.

The simmering tensions prompted an unusually prickly comment from Razmik Zohrabian, deputy chairman of the ruling Republican Party, who told RFE/RL's Armenian Service that the protesters "are being used to cause trouble in Armenia."

Zohrabian added: "Armenia is no superpower, and superpowers can easily stir up internal strife here. It's not just about Russia. A rivalry of civilizations is under way over whether Armenia should go for European integration or Russia's customs union. So the fight of giants is getting some resonance on the ground here."

To read the full story

RFE/RL's Armenian Service contributed to this report

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

As Armenia Walks Tightrope Between Russia And EU, Public Opinion May Be Shifting

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