X
X

Demographic Divergence

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

After 25 years of independence, some former Soviet republics are experiencing record population decline while others are soaring to new highs. This is a story about demographic destiny.
 
Population: Opposite trends
 
The extent of population loss in many former Soviet republics has been staggering. Ukraine has lost more than 6 million people since gaining independence in 1991, while the Baltic states have lost a combined 20 percent of their population. Russia’s population briefly dipped below 142 million in 2009 -- a post-Soviet low -- but has recently rebounded due to migration, increasing fertility, and declining mortality. In the Caucasus, Armenia and Georgia have experienced similar population decreases while Azerbaijan has surged.
 
Data from Central Asia tell a very different story. Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan all have youthful booming populations that are at historic levels. Kazakhstan’s population fell for over a decade after the dissolution mainly due to an exodus of ethnic Russians and Germans, but has grown overall thanks to strong fertility.
 

To read the full story

Copyright (c) 2016. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Demographic Divergence

1 / 1
X
> <