X
X

Do Trolls Matter?

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Like many people with access to the Internet and a holster full of gadgets, Vladimir Nesterenko is living a double existence.

In real life, the 49-year-old Kyiv native is a published author and darling of the Ukrainian counterculture. 

Online, he's "Adolfych" -- a Russian-speaking mischief-maker who uses his Twitter, Facebook, and Live Journal accounts to comment, sometimes thoughtfully and often profanely, on the deepening conflict with Russia. 

"I know a lot of Muscovites have little dachas in Abkhazia," he wrote in a recent post. "But could these Muscovites have afforded their little dachas if they hadn't gotten rid of the Georgians and turned a flourishing region into cheap f**king sh*t, like they're doing now in Crimea?" 

On another post, responding to Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev's uncharacteristic chest-pounding over a recent round of Western sanctions, he scribbled gleefully, "Podkhuilo razbushevalos" -- a phrase, playing off Ukraine's favored insult of Vladimir Putin, that might best be translated as "D**khead Jr.'s freaking out." 

Adolfych is opinionated. He certainly has bad manners. But is he a troll? 

To read the full story

Copyright (c) 2014. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Do Trolls Matter?

1 / 1
X
> <