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LGBT in Russia: Legal Circuses

A Eurasianet partner post from Coda

Kafkaesque legal wranglings against activists have succeeded in shutting down a gay rights movement in Russia. These four cases paved the way.
 
On July 24, 2013, less than a month af­ter Vladimir Putin had signed an anti-gay pro­pa­ganda law, Alexey Davy­dov, an LGBT ac­tivist, was ar­rested out­side of the Russ­ian State Chil­dren’s Li­brary as he un­wrapped a hand-made ban­ner read­ing “It’s nor­mal to be gay.”
 
“Which law are you us­ing to ar­rest me?” Davy­dov asked two po­lice­men reach­ing to take him by his arms. “It’s a chil­dren es­tab­lish­ment here,” grunted the one on the left. Davy­dov was ush­ered into a po­lice van.
 
In Rus­si­a’s Ad­min­is­tra­tive Code, a law known as Ar­ti­cle 6.21 had been re­cently passed that banned the “pro­pa­ganda of non-tra­di­tional sex­ual re­la­tions among mi­nors.” Davy­dov be­came the first per­son to be charged with break­ing the new law, which was his plan —to be de­tained and to use the in­ci­dent to chal­lenge the law.
 
This is the story of what hap­pened af­ter Davy­dov, in four promi­nent cases.
 

To read the full story

Olga Kravets is a multimedia storyteller based in Paris.

A Eurasianet partner post from Coda

LGBT in Russia: Legal Circuses

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