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Moldova: Shadowy Power Deal Fueling Protesters’ Anger

Fingerling fish are released in 2015 into the Cuciurgan estuary in a program of restocking native fish species in rivers and lakes near the Cuciurgan hydropower station in breakaway Transnistria. Moldova gets some 75-80 percent of its electricity from the power station. (Photo: MoldGRES)

The anti-government protests in Moldova are not just about political power; they are also driven in part by a desire for greater transparency.
 
One source of protesters’ ire is electricity or, specifically, the tangled system under which electrical power is generated and distributed in the country. It is one thing that power prices have increased by about 37 percent since last November, Moldovans grumble. But it is quite another when no one — not even government officials — can state who actually owns the company that provides most of the power for this country of 3.6 million.
 
Moldova gets up to 80 percent of its electricity from a hydropower station, Cuciurgan, located in breakaway Transnistria, a region controlled by pro-Russian separatists.
 

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Moldova: Shadowy Power Deal Fueling Protesters’ Anger

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