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Moscow: Fresh Violence against Ethnic Azeris

In what appears to be the latest sign of an ongoing informal campaign in Russia against minorities from the Caucasus and Central Asia, a prominent member of the Azerbaijani Diaspora in Russia has been shot and wounded.

Mais Kurbanov, deputy president of the Russian Federation of Migrants, was attacked by an unidentified group near his Moscow apartment in the early hours of November 12, APA reported. Russian news outlets report that a nearby CCTV camera caught a “young blonde woman” firing a gun at Kurbanov. Wounded, Kurbanov reportedly ran to a nearby café, while his attackers swiftly left the scene. He survived and remains in the hospital.

The motives of the attack are not yet known, but some Azerbaijanis will see a connection to the outpouring of Russian nationalism in the wake of last month's killing of 25-year-old Russian Yegor Shcherbakov, a crime blamed on an Azerbaijani labor migrant, Orhan Zeynalov.

Crime may not be a rare occurrence in Moscow, but South-Caucasus residents often get the impression that, for many Russians these days, crimes committed by a dark-haired person from the Caucasus are worse than others.  The violence against migrant workers that followed Schcherbakov's death, the police manhandling of Zeynalov and the arrests and deportations of Azerbaijanis that followed Shcherbakov's murder have fueled anger in Azerbaijan.

Meanwhile, the violence against ethnic Azeris in Moscow continues. On November 13, APA reported about the death of an Azerbaijani flower seller, apparently knifed to death. Possible reasons for the attack have not been released.

Russian Federation of Migrants President Muhammad Amin Majumder, though, said he suspects that ethnic motives are behind the attack against his deputy, Kurbanov. Majumber claimed that his group and he have faced increased hate-speech of late.

Russian officials, as yet, have stood mostly to one side. Gazeta.ru reported that the Federation requested, unsuccessfully, that the Moscow city government postpone the November 4 “Russian March 2013,” a massive rally of nationalists who have called for ousting ethnic minorities from Russia.


The demonstrators went ahead, carrying posters bearing slogans such as “Russia for the Russians” and “Today There Is a Mosque – Tomorrow There Will Be a Jihad.”

Moscow: Fresh Violence against Ethnic Azeris

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