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Separating Fact from Fiction in Russia’s ‘Information Wars’

A Eurasianet partner post from Coda

The flurry of hacking, paranoia and fake news which preceded the biggest upset in recent US political history has led to talk of a new “information war” with Russia. But even as they debate the possibility of a Russian role in President-Elect Donald Trump’s unexpected victory at the polls, analysts and media alike need to understand the nature of Russian information warfare—and how the response can be just as damaging as the tactic itself.
 
The use of (dis)information to undermine the enemy is as old as the Trojan Horse. Back in the 6th Century B.C., the Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu was already advising that the ideal form of attack would see you defeat an enemy purely psychologically, without landing a physical blow. Today, the information revolution allows for an unprecedented number of ways to influence and subvert other countries.
 

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Peter Pomeranzev is the author of “Nothing is True and Everything is Possible” and is a Consulting Editor for . Coda l Disinformation Crisis.

A Eurasianet partner post from Coda

Separating Fact from Fiction in Russia’s ‘Information Wars’

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