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The First 40 Days: Uzbekistan's Tales of Success and the Reality on the Ground

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

Coming out of 2015, Uzbekistan’s authorities were able to ignore signs of an economic decline by citing their own figures, which in some cases were supported by international financial organizations. But these tales of success could scarcely veil the reality on the ground, at least to those who were watching closely.
 
For the government, economic concerns were a secondary priority as authorities continued to warn of the threat of extremism and take action to root out any signs of it on Uzbekistan’s territory. Security has always been the priority for President Islam Karimov, and during 2015 his government was contending with the returning migrant laborers, some of whom were allegedly radicalized while working in Russia; and across the southern border in Afghanistan the Taliban was making advances in areas adjacent to Central Asia, and some of the Taliban’s allies were fighters from the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan.
 

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Copyright (c) 2016. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.

A Eurasianet partner post from RFE/RL

The First 40 Days: Uzbekistan's Tales of Success and the Reality on the Ground

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