X
X

Turkmenbashi Lives On, in Vodka

Turkmenbashi Vodka. Photo: Christine Quirk

Ever since Turkmenistan’s eccentric despot Saparmurat “Turkmenbashi” Niyazov died in late 2006, his eccentric, despotic successor has been busy refocusing Niyazov’s pagan-like personality cult on himself. 

But Niyazov lives on in one distinct brand that the current strongman dares not touch: Turkmenbashi Vodka. 

Bottles of vodka bearing Turkmenbashi’s likeness are in high demand in Ashgabat, the Chronicles of Turkmenistan website reported on April 23.

Not only is the drink still available, but the “types … are becoming more diverse,” the Chronicles, run by exiled Turkmen opposition members, said. “A few days ago souvenir boxes [of vodka] called 'Gift from Turkmenbashi the Great' appeared on the shelves." The new release sells for 152 manats ($53) a bottle (about a sixth of the official monthly salary) and is, according to salespeople in Ashgabat, in high demand: "Perhaps many people in the country believe life was better under Turkmenbashi," the website said.

It is also probably foreign visitors’ favorite gag gift. 

Turkmenbashi Vodka won the grand prix at a vodka tasting in Yalta, then in Ukraine, back in 2001, state media boasted at the time. (Turkmenistan.ru also said the bottle won a certificate for best design: “By the way, with a portrait of Saparmurat Niyazov.”)

To EurasiaNet’s knowledge, Niyazov successor, Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, who likes to be called Arkadag ("Protector") and fancies himself a sportsman, has not yet plastered his image on any consumables. But if pinup calendars are your thing, the Protector is your man. 

Turkmenbashi Lives On, in Vodka

1 / 1
X
> <