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With Opening of Turkish Border, Georgia's Armenians Grow Uneasy

An old Ottoman fortress in Akhalkalaki, Georgia

A few weeks ago, residents of the village of Dadash, on Georgia's border with Turkey, blocked the main highway connecting the two countries. Their aim, they said, was to call attention to rampant lawlessness in the area since the opening of the border post with Turkey in 2015.
 
In particular, they assert that their livestock is being stolen, blaming Turks in neighboring towns.
 
A member of Georgia's parliament, Enzel Mkoyan, visited the village the day after the protest to hear out their grievances. A large majority of area residents is ethnic Armenian.
 
Residents told him that cameras on the Turkish side showed that the stolen animals had indeed been taken over the border. They also maintained that local authorities have been of little help.
 
“We live on the border and are very worried,” one of the villagers, Tsolak Martirosyan said at the meeting, according to an account by local news website JNews.ge. “Why is the Turkish side equipped with video cameras, and our side isn’t? What century do we live in?”
 

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With Opening of Turkish Border, Georgia's Armenians Grow Uneasy

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